...

Over the past couple of months, I have been vacillating on this issue; the issue of whether to return to my roots of the Known content management system, or to stay within the WordPress ecosystem for my personal web presence. I figured it might be a prudent idea to outline the pros and cons of both and get people’s thoughts on them. Let me know what you think…
For Known:
1. Known Is Customizable via HTML, a great thing for me since I need a reason to learn HTML 5
2. It has IndieWeb support natively out of the box
3. All themes work with the IndieWeb functionality

For WordPress:
1. Less HTML handcrafting necessary
2. More available themes
3. More available plugins than I know what to do with

Regarding that last, however, most of the plugins that are available for WordPress take it so far off the rails from its original reason for being created in the first place, which makes me hesitate to consider using any of them, for fear that my site might lose the very purpose of its existence. My site exists as a blog and as a commonplace book. what do the citizens think?

Known In Higher demand for Developers

Here, the choice is simple. It’s my eventual goal to develop for some of the smaller web communities, focusing on the smaller folks who need more features. Known would be perfect for that, considering there are still a bunch of things that haven’t yet been implemented since people only have so much time during their day to work on projects. I could gladly see myself assisting over there, and hopefully I will, providing I can learn enough of the PHP language to be proficient in it. I will keep everyone posted… so watch this space for more as progress is made.

https://www.customerservant.com/8156-2/ by Amanda Rush We combine twenty years of web development experience with thirty years of assistive technology use to assist our clients with expanding their audience, polishing their brand's image, and improving the usability of their websites and apps for everyone through practical application of web accessibility guidelines.Amanda Rush We combine twenty years of web development experience with thirty years of assistive technology use to assist our clients with expanding their audience, polishing their brand's image, and improving the usability of their websites and apps for everyone through practical application of web accessibility guidelines. (customerservant.com)
I agree with this entire thread, especially the action part. Don’t get me wrong. Awareness is great. But we’ve been doing awareness now for I don’t know how many years or even decades, and it just seems to me that for every step forward we take, there are six more going backwards. If awareness...

I really don’t think I could have said this better … It is about time that more people step in. But part of it … the training for developers; especially developers that teach themselves languages from books, classes, and what not. Where are they going to be able to pull accessibility information from where it doesn’t feel (to them) like extra work?